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Until 2009, CARRS-Q research was grouped into Illegal and High Risk Behaviours, Human Behaviour and Technology Interface, Vulnerable Road Users, School and Community Based Road Safety and Work Related Road SafetyView current research.

 

School and Community Based Road Safety - project archive
 
Stakki Stikka - evaluating the effectiveness of an incentive program to increase bicycle helmet usage
Evaluation of Queensland Transport's statistical measurement of the effectiveness of bicycle helmets
Evaluation of Queensland Transport's Christmas road safety campaign
Effectiveness of threat appeals in road safety advertising
Development of a model tender for the evaluation of the ACT Novice Driver Safety Program
Ready to Go - development of a resource for tutors of learner drivers
Put Yourself in the Picture - development of a resource for older drivers
Safe travel for school communities
Guidelines for conducting road safety research in Indigenous communities
Evaluation of a drink driving resource for young people
School Transport Task Force

Photo of a Stakki StikkaStakki Stikka - evaluating the effectiveness of an incentive program to increase bicycle helmet usage
CARRS-Q assisted with the preparation of an application for funding to evaluate a community based pilot study designed to increase bicycle helmet wearing among school children on the Sunshine Coast. Stakki Stikka is an incentive based helmet wearing scheme whereby school children are issued with a "registration sticker" to place on their bicycle helmet, and community members are encouraged to report the registration number to a Stakki Stikka hotline if they observe the bicycle rider wearing the helmet correctly, resulting in a (sponsored) reward for the rider.
Status: completed
Contact: Darren Wishart

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Photo of an adult adjusting the straps on a child's bicycle helmetEvaluation of Queensland Transport's statistical measurement of the effectiveness of bicycle helmets
In 1991/92, the Queensland Government introduced legislation to make the wearing of bicycle helmets compulsory for all cyclists and a penalty was introduced in January 1993 for failure to wear a helmet. This project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the legislation in reducing road trauma associated with cyclists.

It estimated the expected reduction in the number of fatal crashes involving at least one cyclist, using pedestrians and motorcyclists as comparison groups to account for account for confounding factors that ma effect the entire road systems. To examine cyclists specific influences, comparisons were also made between head injuries and other injuries sustained by cyclists before and after the introduction of the legislation. Finally, an attempt was made to examine the pre-existing helmet wearing rates to delineate between voluntary wearing of helmet and the effect of the legislation.
Status: completed
Contact: Vic Siskind

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Evaluation of Queensland Transport's Christmas road safety campaign
In an attempt to address the road toll, Queensland Transport, the Queensland Police Service and the Department of Premier and Cabinet developed the 'Road Safety Initiative Package'. Cabinet approved a trial road safety program for the 8 week period 14 December 2001 to 8 February 2002 (Cabinet Decision No. 2952 of 19 November 2001). A component of the approval was the undertaking of an evaluation of the impact of the Road Safety Trial over this period to be reported to Cabinet in April 2002. The trial period and evaluation commenced on 14 December 2001 and covered the traditionally busy Christmas/New Year holiday period as well as the Australia Day long weekend.
The aims of this evaluation were to:
- examine the effects of the Holiday Period Road Safety Trial; and
- pilot the methodology for evaluating longer-term components of 'Road Safety
Initiative Package'.
Status: completed
Contact: Barry Watson or Colin Edmonston

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Effectiveness of threat appeals in road safety advertising
There have been three programs of research in this area to date:
a) Theoretical Foundations of Road Safety Publicity Campaigns - examining the theoretical issues relating to the use of publicity campaigns in road safety, including the examination of the theory underlying the use of fear appeals in road safety campaigns, a critical review of the relationship between fear and persuasiveness, the efficacy of the communication, the self-efficacy of the audience and segmentation or the selection of appropriate target audience.
b) Methodological Concerns on Fear Appeals Research - examining several concerns regarding the logic and methodologies used in previous research on fear appeals, especially in the investigation of the relationship between the level of fear and persuasiveness.
c) Effectiveness of Road Safety Campaigns in Australasia - an evaluation of the effectiveness of the road safety campaigns implemented in Australia and New Zealand over the last decade.
Status: current
Contact: Barry Watson or Ioni Lewis

Development of a model tender for the evaluation of the ACT Novice Driver Safety ProgramCARRS-Q was commissioned by The Department of Urban Services to establish the parameters of an evaluation of the Road Ready program. A range of issues were identified that needed to be addressed. A broad range of evaluation strategies were outlined as being required to address both process and outcome characteristics of the program. This would provide important information for both managing the on-going implementation of the program and assessing its road safety significance.
Status: completed
Contact: Barry Watson
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Ready To Go logoReady to Go - development of a resource for tutors of learner drivers
CARRS-Q was commissioned to research and develop a resource package of learning materials to assist the tutors of learner drivers - published by Queensland Transport.
Status: completed
Contact: Cynthia Schonfeld

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Put Yourself in the Picture posterPut Yourself in the Picture - development of a resource for older drivers
A resource package of learning materials to assist older drivers to better manage their day-to-day driving activity - commissioned and published by Queensland Transport.
Status: completed
Contact: Cynthia Schonfeld

 

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Safe travel for school communities trial and evaluation
The Safe Travel for School Communities Trial was conducted in the latter half of 2002 at four sites throughout Queensland - Tullawong, Childers, Tannum Sands and Cairns West. Phase one of the project involved the provision of community engagement and road safety training to a Community Participation Officer (CPO) in each of the four trial sites. Phase two of the project involved six month on-the-ground trials in the chosen school communities. During this time, CPOs [with the support of regional QT and education authorities] aimed to engage the local community in the development of a Local School Transport Action Plan and work towards goals specified in the plan. Phase three of the project involved a comprehensive process evaluation of the trial, including post-trial consultations with CPOs, regional road safety advisors, school community members and the manager of QT Community Programs Section. Using and "action research" framework [ie. the logic model of program evaluation], the evaluation: (1) identified the strengths and weaknesses associated with different engagement methodologies; and (2) examined the transferability and sustainability of varying approaches. The outcomes of the trial were tabled to Queensland Transport and will influence future community-based road safety policy and practice in Queensland.
Status: completed
Contact: Colin Edmonston

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Guidelines for conducting road safety research in Indigenous communities
Indigenous communities throughout Australia report negative experiences of research projects due to the use of culturally-inappropriate data collection methods, lack of community control/involvement, lack of local benefits, and interpretation of data in isolation of social context *(Henderson et al., 2002). This proejct aims to improve our collective understanding of Indigenous health and road safety issues by providing non-Indigenous researchers with comprehensive guidelines on how to conduct research and work with Indigenous populations. It moves beyond textbook research issues (ie language, privacy and questioning approaches) into protocol issues and practical reality through the use of a practical case-study (the Indigenous Licensing Project) to describe how community research has been appropriately undertaken. Where possible, poor examples of Indigenous research conduct will be discussed for comparison.
*Henderson, R., Simmons, D., Bourke, L. & Muir, J. (2002). Development of guideliens for non-Indigenous people undertaking research among the Indigenous population of north-east Victoria. The Medical Journal of Australia, 176(10), 482-485.
Status: current
Contact: Colin Edmonston

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Evaluation of a drink driving resource for young people
This evaluation examined the usage of the teaching resource kit called "Death of an Innocent" in Queensland high schools to gain feedback regarding the appropriateness, usefulness and any potential improvements that could be made to this resource. A survey questinnaire was sent to year 12 teachers and principals at the schools that requested this kit.
Status: completed
Contact: Cynthia Schonfeld or Angela Wallace

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School Transport Task Force
Based on a six-month review of current policy and practice, extensive community consultation and advice from experts and practitioners, the School Transport Safety Task Force handed down recommendations to government in October 2001 to improve school transport safety in Queensland. The overwhelming conviction of the Task Force (2001) was that school transport safety is a 'whole-of-community' problem and that interventions will only work with 'whole-of-community' awareness and commitment. The Task Force stressed that community partnerships would need operational leadership from Queensland Transport (QT) and state education authorities. The recommendations targeted four broad deliverables: (1) safe school zones; (2) safe communities; (3) safe buses; and (4) evaluation and monitoring.
Status: completed
Contact: Colin Edmonston